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Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

American families and individuals support themselves, obtain health coverage and achieve a sense of dignity and accomplishment from working. Unlike our private lives, we do not get to pick who we work with. As a result, in the United States, people at work are not allowed to interfere with our jobs or our ability to earn a living. There are Community Security Rules that protect all of us, including you, your families and children. Thus sexual harassment is illegal under the Federal law, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and under Florida law, Chapter 760.10 et seq., Sexual harassment

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I Slept with the Boss to Keep My Job. Is this Sexual Harassment?

Americans support their families, secure their future and achieve a sense of dignity through their work. In our country no one is permitted to manipulate our jobs or careers. But it is a reality of the workplace that a few people have power over the majority of workers. These few often have the power to fire at will and end careers. Therefore, the law prohibits people in power, whether the CEO, an officer, a manager or supervisor from manipulating, directly or indirectly, an employee into sexual relations. Over the years, many more women have entered the workforce making them more

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What is Sexual Harassment Retaliation?

Under the federal law, Title VII and Florida law, an employer is prohibited from taking or allowing an “adverse employment action” against an employee because he or she has challenged or opposed a discriminatory employment practice, or because she has filed an EEOC charge, testified, assisted or participated in any manner in opposing a discriminatory action. Corporate Employers must ensure that employees are not subjected to sexual harassment or other forms of illegal discrimination. Employers must protect employees from retaliation (i.e., punishment) who report possible sexual harassment or discrimination. What is an “adverse” employment action? Certain employer actions – such

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Examples of Sexual Harassment

Examples of Sexual Harassment under Florida and federal law that are illegal include the following: Creating an offensive working environment by repeated written, verbal, or visual contacts with sexual overtones; written forms may include suggestive or obscene letters, notes, invitations; verbal forms may include derogatory comments, slurs, jokes, epithets; physical forms may include assault, unwelcome touching, impeding or blocking movements; and visual forms may include leering, gestures, display of sexually offensive objects, pictures, cartoons or posters. Establishing a pattern of conduct that would cause discomfort or humiliate a reasonable person at whom the conduct was directed and that includes one

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Florida Pregnancy Discrimination in the Workplace

The citizens of the United States have decided that women and families should not lose their livelihoods, careers and right to support their families because of the natural processes associated with childbirth. Thus, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) is an amendment to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  Discrimination in the Workplace on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions constitutes unlawful sex discrimination under Title VII. Hiring and Working Conditions An employer cannot refuse to hire a woman because of her pregnancy related condition if she can perform the major functions of her job.  An employer

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Workers Compensation Retaliation in Florida

The citizens of Florida have decided that we should not lose our livelihoods, careers and right to support our families because of an injury at work. Because it could happen to anyone, Florida law protects the safety, security and health of all members of our community in their employment rights. Thus, in Florida, a worker who can prove that he or she was fired, intimidated or coerced because of a valid claim for workers compensation, or attempt to claim compensation, has a cause of action against an employer for retaliatory discharge. Florida Statute §440.205 reads as follows: No employer shall discharge, threaten to discharge, intimidate,

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